Author Topic: Working resonance circuit  (Read 28975 times)

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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #48 on: December 20, 2009, 22:48:05 pm »
steve,

your second drawing with the idea of a vic incorperated...   im looking at maybe a different approach for the power supply and pulsing..

im looking to use a variac powering a vic supplying the chokes...  stan shows the use of a scr on the positive side of the supply..    and he connect strait to ground... i know  we have spoke about the scr not being able to turn off when being applied to chokes, but what about the scr being applied to a vic...would the charging of the toroidal reach a point where current stops in the primary? due to the fact that this circuit is condensing electrons to the back side of d4... then since you use the coil to build a isolated load then once the scr switches off the toroid will collapse and provide a pulse to the circuit.??

The use of a SCR is the same as using a sold state relais, or FET or transistor.
You have to know how to switch it on and off. Thats the whole idea of creating pulses. There is no magic is the choice of components, as far as i have seen the last couple of years.
Stan used the variac with scr to create a pulsed half rectified signal. I have seen it, because i replicated that 2 years ago. Because resonance is independed on voltage level, it doesnt matter if your voltage is fluctuating.

Every coil will stop pulling amps as soon as it is saturated. That means also for the primairy coil of a VIC.
Whats left is the resistance of that coil against the powersupply. You will notic a high amp peak of charging the coil and then it will level out.

Steve

@Steve
Trying to improve this circuit...more questions:

Is it correct that you only use pulse frequency for LC resonance to create AC signal on tubes?

When looking at the configuration of the diodes connected between the tubes, you are only using half rectified AC signal on tube one and the other half rectified AC on tube two.
If you replace diode to full rectifier bridge, then you doubled the frequency and using all AC signal on tube one and tube two?

Do you see a solution for gate signal, to restrict more current?

br,
Webmug

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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #49 on: December 20, 2009, 22:57:59 pm »
i have been thinking on current and how we need to match the impeadance of the chokes to meet primarys..  i think i have a good perspective to consider with current...  i think it can be seen in a basic way and in a more complex...

simple way is how a amp meter works.. its function is to tell you how many electrons are passing a given line in a local space (the wire) the count a amp meter will give doesnt consider the parameters  of the wire confining the traveling charge...

the more complex view would be to consider how many  electrons are passing a given point in a wire.. when i say a given point i mean considering the interaction from the perspective of one copper atom in the circuit and the  count of its exchange of electrons in its unipolar direction (DC).. once figuring that out you know the actual speed of moving charge and you match that perspective of exchange for your primary and choke then can couple ground through its arbitrary connection (mosfet) along with primary to me this seems like a way to take out signal degration factor during pulsing..

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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #50 on: December 21, 2009, 11:51:39 am »
steve,

your second drawing with the idea of a vic incorperated...   im looking at maybe a different approach for the power supply and pulsing..

im looking to use a variac powering a vic supplying the chokes...  stan shows the use of a scr on the positive side of the supply..    and he connect strait to ground... i know  we have spoke about the scr not being able to turn off when being applied to chokes, but what about the scr being applied to a vic...would the charging of the toroidal reach a point where current stops in the primary? due to the fact that this circuit is condensing electrons to the back side of d4... then since you use the coil to build a isolated load then once the scr switches off the toroid will collapse and provide a pulse to the circuit.??

The use of a SCR is the same as using a sold state relais, or FET or transistor.
You have to know how to switch it on and off. Thats the whole idea of creating pulses. There is no magic is the choice of components, as far as i have seen the last couple of years.
Stan used the variac with scr to create a pulsed half rectified signal. I have seen it, because i replicated that 2 years ago. Because resonance is independed on voltage level, it doesnt matter if your voltage is fluctuating.

Every coil will stop pulling amps as soon as it is saturated. That means also for the primairy coil of a VIC.
Whats left is the resistance of that coil against the powersupply. You will notic a high amp peak of charging the coil and then it will level out.

Steve

@Steve
Trying to improve this circuit...more questions:

Is it correct that you only use pulse frequency for LC resonance to create AC signal on tubes?

When looking at the configuration of the diodes connected between the tubes, you are only using half rectified AC signal on tube one and the other half rectified AC on tube two.
If you replace diode to full rectifier bridge, then you doubled the frequency and using all AC signal on tube one and tube two?

Do you see a solution for gate signal, to restrict more current?

br,
Webmug


The idea is to shoot one puls into an LCR circuit.
That circuit will start resonating and keeps on resonating till all charge has leaked.
To prevend that this proces stops, the circuit keeps on pulsing into the LCR with some time delay = gated pulse
So, one pulse, provides many after shocks, so to speak.

The tubes are half rectified, so they always see an unipolar puls and not AC.

Steve





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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #51 on: December 21, 2009, 13:32:15 pm »
this would be a good example of matching impeadance i think...

lets say you have 2 wires.. 1 is 10ga. the other is 20ga..
this means that one wire is twice the size in diameter then the other...

if the 10ga current is lets say 4 amps, then the 20 ga. being half the dia of 10ga.. only needs to pass 2 amps of current to match the speed of traveling charge in the 10ga.  so if this holds tru then as you can see as the wire gets smaller it doesnt have to carry high amps to beable to match and couple primary to a choke... the other choke being connected to the secondary with a diode.... (the choke labeled ground in schematics)

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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #52 on: December 21, 2009, 13:43:32 pm »
You are getting too complicated  try to keep it simple stupid make it, work on it and you will understand where to go. my thread is good start.

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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #53 on: December 21, 2009, 13:58:49 pm »
i see your system and i understand that you have reached a form of resonance within your system... im trying to look at your set up as well as steves drawing and tryng to make it work with what stan has written... 

when your trying to match a signal within a system primarys and secondarys off different potentials  you would think this would be the way to do it.....  it would make sense for the speed of electrons moving in a circuit  to be matched to keep distortion out of the signal...   you would think that the change in speed of electrons would be proportional with the changing of potential.. this would allow dual resonance of 6-1 maybe

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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #54 on: December 21, 2009, 14:30:14 pm »
Is simpler than that,  a coil and a  a capacitor, and a transformer for 10khz few turns on the primary and 3 times more on the secondary with 3,5mm wire. Connect everything, secondary, choke, capacitor, cells and than close again in the secondary what you get is a parallel resonance, use a capacitor between primary leads and a capacitor from source to drain of our mosfet, Use a diode in series from positive side of the batery to the primary... Resonance simply . connect an Ameter in series with the circuit and on the primary. and a voltmeter and frequency meter between the choke sides.


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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #55 on: December 21, 2009, 15:32:07 pm »
can you like draw that with a circuit simulator or something like that?
i'd want to see where the parallel resonance is exactly.