Author Topic: Working resonance circuit  (Read 25995 times)

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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #24 on: December 14, 2009, 14:33:33 pm »
Hi steve,

what is the sine wave amplitude on the capacitor when you are having 120v accross each cell?

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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #25 on: December 14, 2009, 15:27:41 pm »
steve,

your second drawing with the idea of a vic incorperated...   im looking at maybe a different approach for the power supply and pulsing..

im looking to use a variac powering a vic supplying the chokes...  stan shows the use of a scr on the positive side of the supply..    and he connect strait to ground... i know  we have spoke about the scr not being able to turn off when being applied to chokes, but what about the scr being applied to a vic...would the charging of the toroidal reach a point where current stops in the primary? due to the fact that this circuit is condensing electrons to the back side of d4... then since you use the coil to build a isolated load then once the scr switches off the toroid will collapse and provide a pulse to the circuit.??

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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #26 on: December 14, 2009, 16:44:26 pm »
Stan used a variac only to control the speed of the motor that drove his alternator setup. And when he was inputing more voltage to be able to higher the voltage output because of the high impedance but when you have it set up well you can actually go for 12v you better to use a high amperage diode straight from the 12v positive with a choke in series before the primary that has the same inductance of the primary of your input transformer. I use irfp250 diodes with 200nf snubber connected from source to drain. This makes it work very cold. Try using 3 times more turns for the secondary and connect it in series with your choke and capacitor and drive it to resonance. You have to use iron powder core Note that the secondary wire and chokes should be thick. You want a good coupling here.

You have to become a genius to follow and understand the genius simplicity.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2009, 17:18:54 pm by sebosfato »

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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #27 on: December 14, 2009, 18:15:33 pm »
I actually have all components except the diodes. 0,1µF 1000V cap, bifilar 1,16mH coil, tubes probably.
Since i'd be very surprised if steve's little coils would survive more than a few watts i guess it's save to use 1000V/1A diodes?

did you use a sine wave or square wave?

also excel sheet for calculation with circuit 1. adjust orange boxes.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2009, 19:15:04 pm by haithar »

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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #28 on: December 14, 2009, 19:06:52 pm »
USE 20 OF THEM

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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #29 on: December 14, 2009, 19:15:33 pm »
do you think there will be 20kV?

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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #30 on: December 14, 2009, 20:59:06 pm »

As far as i can see it will not even be a half kW. 

I can explain some, but not all yet... When you split by Volt, there is close to no current. The resonance is a kind of cold fusion in a self splitting reaction.
A bit current will be measured, but more like milliamp @ with the Volt you have designed the circuit for.

This is the needle in the haystack "we" are looking for.

« Last Edit: December 14, 2009, 21:23:10 pm by WaytoGo »

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Re: Working resonance circuit
« Reply #31 on: December 14, 2009, 22:15:32 pm »
what resonance is everybody talking about by the way? i only see a series resonant circuit, but having this in resonance is kinda useless  ???