Author Topic: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly  (Read 123589 times)

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2009, 00:10:35 am »
That description doesn't ring familiar, I must not have it, I went through all my collected material yesterday looking for pictures of Stan's circuit board.

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #9 on: September 29, 2009, 18:27:04 pm »
Normally this would produce 3-phase AC, however
Diodes do not conduct "backwards"
Thus circuit is "disconnected" or "off" during negative portion of the cycle,
The alternating magnetic field from the rotor only creates a voltage in the stator when the diodes conduct forwards
Therefore this is always unipolar



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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2009, 19:19:34 pm »
Thoughts on theory

(With reference to my above drawing and the directions indicated therein)

This is an alternator, but it doesn't create an output ANYTHING like an alternator.

Compare:
1. A high voltage stator wound like  normal with 300 turns per loop, you would create the given voltage due to the turns.
2. A high voltage stator wound trifilar with 100 turns per loop (x3 = 300), and connected in series.

Each has the same amount of wire, each has the same amount of turns in total.
But the 2. has 42 loops per phase at 100 turns, rather than 14 loops at 300 turns.
The electrons in 2. will travel around the stator core 3 times before exiting, rather than once.

Stator 1. would produce normal high voltage 3 phase ac with proportionally reduced amps.
Now consider the blocking diodes in 2. and look at the back emf.

Every time the magnetic field of the rotor switches to induce a negative voltage, the diodes switch off, and the magnetic field of the stator collapses.

The "Top Choke" bemf with initially go backwards against the diode, but then be forced in the opposite direction, towards V+ or clockwise.

Meanwhile the "Secondary" and the "Bottom Choke" bemf will travel counter clockwise, and since they are trifilar wound, this happens right next to eachother, and it happens 3 times around the stator core.

Also consider, during this bemf collapse, the rotors magnetic field is 'trying' to induce a negative voltage in the stator, or counter clockwise, so the rotor is working with the bottom choke and the secondary, and working against the top choke.

surely a cluster f**k of magnetic fields going on, surely it restricts the amps, causes electron bounce, and allows voltage to take over.

I didn't even mention the other two phases, but lets consider them now.

every 60 degrees you have the next phase, so you have the emf and bemf cycle constantly going on and overlapping and creating mutual induction from one phase to the next due to proximity and one damn confused stator core.

this means that at one particular time you have one phase conducting, and two pahses making bemf, and then at another paticular time you have 2 phases conducting and 1 phase making bemf, and at any other time you have some combination of the cycle, all overlapping.

After considering this design, I can somewhat conclude that you will be able to pull some unipolar voltage out of it, but pulling current out of it would be like trying to get your lawn chair back from a hurricane.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2009, 22:47:09 pm by Donaldwfc »

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2009, 22:46:10 pm »
@Donaldwfc

Interesting theory!
Maybe the way to get the current out of the alternator, We can "Bi-, Tri-filar wind the coils (L2,L5,L8)" this lowers the Impedance of the coils, The coils are in series.
I have no idea if all the coils (L1..L9) must be wound that way. It makes sense that all the coils must be in the same field in the stator, but the coils must match the load @rpms. Looks difficult to make this kind of coil configuration.

I'm still using the alternator in the 'old' configuration. When my 'old' setup is running again......, I could look into this too.

Pulse and gate can be applied.

"Pulsating (switch off/on)
Rotating magnetic field (adjusting magnetic field strength to allow voltage potential to be developed across pickup windings 'secundary' while current leakage is held to a minimum value)"

br,
Webmug
« Last Edit: October 02, 2009, 10:30:08 am by webmug »

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #12 on: October 01, 2009, 01:21:21 am »
Maybe the way to get the current out of the alternator,
- We don't want current out of the alternator? we want it to act as an amp restrictor, and just get the voltage out

We can "Bi-, Tri-filar wind the coils (L2,L5,L8)" this lowers the Impedance of the coils,
-I thought of that, following my example of 42 loops at 100 turns, you could do six-filar, and then have 84 loops at 50 turns, but the reason why i am happy with 42 loops is because that is how many there are in the famous VIC Coil... 14 grooves * 3 coils = 42 loops! It's the same!

I hope you try this stator circuit, I think it makes sense and fits with the clues, so I see value in building it.

In your drawing there, showing pulsing the rotor. Would you be so kind as to provide an explanation to why this is useful, because it doesn't make sense to me. It might be a brilliant idea, but with my understanding, I just don't get it.
Here is why:
The rotor is designed to run on straight DC, the output of the stator is exactly proportional to the strength of the magnetic field in the rotor, and the strength of the rotor is exactly proportional to the current flowing in the rotor, pulsing the rotor will reduce the current which reduces magnetic field strength which reduces the output of the stator. Pulsing the rotor does not control the output frequency of the alternator, the output frequency of the alternator is controlled by the rpms, so if you want to adjust frequency you have to adjust the driving speed. The alternator is not like an AC transformer... 60 Hz in = 60Hz out, its a DC to 3pAC rotary transformer.

Thanks


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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #13 on: October 01, 2009, 02:40:36 am »
Take notice to how the Rotor is shaped, as if the poles are triangles, not squares. Understand that the frequency put into this rotor will be riding on the shape of the poles, as they rake across the stator thats square. Like a Triangle magnet raking across a square coil, accept the triangle magnet has a viberation caused by a pwm.

Just a small bit of my thoughts, as i am once again,, wasting thread space..

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #14 on: October 01, 2009, 04:51:08 am »
have you had any better results with that?

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Re: Rotary Pulse Voltage Frequency Generator Assembly
« Reply #15 on: October 01, 2009, 22:08:03 pm »
Donald, Stan was pulsing the stator on the alternator! When Stan uses the Vari-ac and runs it through a full bridge rectifier,you have 60 hertz before the bridge,and 120 hertz after.So Stan was pulsing the rotor at 120 hertz.The voltage coming out of the vari-ac is 60 hertz a/c.Do you understand this point?It's easy to forget about the line voltage frequency.
Don