Author Topic: AC electrolysis  (Read 20129 times)

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Re: AC electrolysis
« Reply #40 on: June 26, 2010, 08:33:20 am »
Single diode with two chokes? Are you referring to Stan's LC circuit? I know in his setup the diode is very important, with out it you wont get high voltages to you cell. I've tested this with my setup. I applied 20V to my primary and pulsed it with a 5V pulse via a 2N3055 transistor and I got 280V out of my transformer. I made my transformer to Stan's specs of 200 wraps on the primary, 600 wraps for the secondary and 100 bifilar turns for my chokes all wound on a single core. Without the diode I only get around 40V out and with the diode I get 280V out. It also depends on which end of your primary is connected to the variable DC voltage and which end is connected to the pulsing.

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Re: AC electrolysis
« Reply #41 on: June 26, 2010, 09:01:06 am »
That is not what  I asked but that is nice you built that .

Any good results ? I guess not ...

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Re: AC electrolysis
« Reply #42 on: June 26, 2010, 14:14:13 pm »
Dankie try adding a minimum resistance to the sim on multisim It use to help avoiding his kind of problems. I used it a lot in the las 4 years. Very cool sim.

Ac electrolysis can't happen alone, it is only used on the resonance part of the thing. You need dc component of the current. How one could apply high frequency field to an  electrolyses while having thru the same set of electrodes huge current dc. Witch is the only way you can have high frequency voltage field being applied and at the same time create dc current of huge amperage??? 




 

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Re: AC electrolysis
« Reply #43 on: June 27, 2010, 07:25:13 am »
Tony woodside that is not what I asked you , I do not know what you were reading .


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Re: AC electrolysis
« Reply #44 on: December 24, 2010, 19:13:24 pm »
Hi all,

Been a while since I posted to this thread.  I've spent my time when not working on researching and building a resonant cell array.  Not being a machinist the build has been challenging and on hold until I obtain another drill press.  I had to return the one I borrowed.

Meanwhile I'd like to share some thoughts regarding AC electrolysis and how Puharich and Meyer might have gone that route and what its advantages are/were.  One has to kind of research the history of discovery and where we are today and how we got here.

I propose a simple experiment.  I have not done it yet but it seems feasible.  Take one wire from a household outlet and wire it to the center of a couple of diodes similar to an avremenko plug.  Take those 2 wires and connect to a light bulb.  Compare the draw from the source to using 2 wires.  Try with the hot wire and the common wire and see if there's a difference in draw from the source.  Measure the heat evolved from the circuit and the light bulb with the different configurations.  This is with a one phase or if you will a 2 phase system since you can do both wires separately and light 2 bulbs.  This relates to Meyer's use of AC to drive his demo cells with household AC current and 3 phase alternator with 9 tubes and pulsing the rotor.  With no load an electric single or 3 phase motor will draw some amps and more amps with load.  Then the circuit needs to be "tuned".  This is sort of related to early automotive ignition systems and positive ground system.  I will post results soon probably after the holidays.  It sort of makes sense to me why there are 9 tubes in the demo cell and 9 wires exiting a 3 phase filar or bifilar generator/alternator and why there are 9 switches.  Any and all of the tubes can individually be on or off with respect to the source.  Meyer only in my opinion gives half of the story but it is his truth and discovery.  We all need to start thinking in higher dimensions not just linearly.  The universe is not flat it is an infinite sphere.  The water molecule is one of the smallest representations of that universe.  Happy Holidays,

Andy

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Re: AC electrolysis
« Reply #45 on: March 28, 2012, 13:09:30 pm »
There is a theory, that i found which i believe seems what meyer based his ideas about universal energy. All protons in the all universe are connected together, they are wormholes or singularities that connects to each other. All this because of the density of the vacuum energy localized within the space inside the nucleus. Seems that the vacuum energy is calculated from getting the plank length which is the smallest wave length possible, ( when a photon basically is about to superpose another) so integrating a volume of space summing all this high energetic small wavelengths will give the density of energy of a given space portion. There is a guy which a friend told me about at the university, called Nassim Haramen that developed this theory explaining this.

Well this explain many things, from intergalactic delay-less communication and so on...

sebs

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Re: AC electrolysis
« Reply #46 on: March 28, 2012, 15:32:02 pm »
I like this kind of info, Seb!
Thanks for sharing!

Steve

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Re: AC electrolysis
« Reply #47 on: March 28, 2012, 19:14:00 pm »
You welcome my friend,

check his youtube video is pretty amazing when he talks, he start talking or destroying the conservation laws...

I got really interested, cause it became clear to me what Hartmut Muller, John Quincy St Clair, and others were talking about...

sebs