Author Topic: Reversed electrolysis  (Read 9747 times)

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Reversed electrolysis
« on: May 19, 2009, 12:12:08 pm »
Hi members,

A new topic is made for this new theory aka challange.
Its about the technology in which we use an insulated positive electrode / tube /plate and a basic SS negative electrode/tube/plate.
When both electrodes are in a waterbucket, you have created a capacitor with water as dieelectric.

You can measure the capacitance perfectly with a standard LCR meter.
In my case, the tubeset i measured was around 1nF.

The theory is that we pulse the watercapacitor and then discharge the cap and in the proces we take the electrons out of the waterbucket.
This way, the water molecule should fall apart!
I have attached some pictures that show how the electrons behave in such setup.
If you discharge the electrons from the water and negative electrode, they run towards the positive electrode, which is insulated and not directly in touch with the water.
Then the proces should start again. Charge the cap and discharge by shorting.


Maybe we can get some bubbles this way? And even better, Ionized gas output?
Lets make this a worthy topic! ;)

Steve


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Re: Reversed electrolysis
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2009, 15:44:54 pm »
I don't mean to be negative, but from my experiments with insulated electrodes, the water is more like a conductor rather than a dielectric. the material used to insulate the electrodes is the dielectric

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Re: Reversed electrolysis
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2009, 16:32:03 pm »
has anyone ever tried to polish some stainless? can you get stainless to have a mirror shine? i think being polished will help work in a insulating manner?  since a polished non corrosive metal is probly more deterant to corrosion and also more deterant to the throwing off of electrons???

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Re: Reversed electrolysis
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2009, 16:44:31 pm »
I don't mean to be negative, but from my experiments with insulated electrodes, the water is more like a conductor rather than a dielectric. the material used to insulate the electrodes is the dielectric
Ok, i think we agree on that, but the plates/tubes/electrodes are working as a cap.
What woul happens if you can pull electrons from the water in the discharge cycle?

br
Steve

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Re: Reversed electrolysis
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2009, 21:48:16 pm »

 
Quote
has anyone ever tried to polish some stainless?

  Bright SS can be polished. Grey SS will be very tough to polish. You CAN buy polished SS. It's expensive. It has a protective plastic film stuck on it.

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Re: Reversed electrolysis
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2009, 05:25:05 am »
i sanded mine to 2000 grit, if i put polish on them they would be a mirror shine, but i don't want the polish to get in the way or contaminate it. the idea being that a smoother surface will distribute voltage evenly, but i haven't done any tests yet.